Category: Workshops

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Reframing the Final Paper: Alternative and Creative Assignments

This workshop was offered in Spring 2020 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by Inés Vañó García.

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

Writing is a central aspect of academic life. As instructors, we regularly assign essays, compositions, proposals, annotated bibliographies, and final papers. There are, however, alternatives or accompaniments to these written assignments that may accomplish similar goals. Podcasts, zines, timelines, and other creative assignments allow students to produce artifacts with broad audiences in mind, and to acquire knowledge and transferable skills that they can use throughout their lives and careers. These approaches also can invigorate the writing that students do in their courses and, by allowing alternative paths to engage with course material, may facilitate deeper connections with our fields. 

In this workshop we will explore how we might channel the goals of the traditional writing assignment into more creative projects. We will work together to imagine assignments that combine multiple modalities and skills and/or allow students to create public-facing artifacts. And, we’ll discuss how to assess and evaluate such projects.

Attendees are encouraged to bring a traditional written assignment to workshop with the group that they’d like to modify.

Materials

This folder contains outreach materials, workshop plans, slides and accessible assignments as models/examples.

Materials Folder: Reframing the Final Paper: Alternative and Creative Assignments Workshop

Workshop Plan

Introductions (5-10 min.)

  • Name
  • Program
  • Course
  • Goals/Expectations 

Warm-up questions (10-15 min.) 

  • In your experience, what are the advantages and constraints/limitations of traditional writing assignments?
  • What type of alternative and creative assignments do we envision in our courses? What are the  advantages and constraints/limitations of these types of assignments?
  • Do you have a written assignment that you plan on redesign during this workshop? Tell us a little bit more about it.

Exploration Stage (20-25 min.): Presentation of models/examples & discussion

Assignment (20-25min.):

  • Final artifact: podcast, zine, timelines, video, installations, multi-modal essays – (be ready with examples)
  • Assignment (Re)Design:
    • Goal(s) of the assignment (skills)
    • Scaffolding of the assignment
    • Assessment
    • Final product and audience

Puesta en común (15 min.)

Social Reading and Writing

This workshop was offered in Spring 2016 and Spring 2017 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by Anke Geertsma and Elizabeth Decker.

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

Are you looking for ways to improve your students’ close reading skills or to kickstart class discussion by asking students to annotate readings online as a group before they come to class? Are you trying to find (new) strategies for peer review or collaborative writing projects? Or are you designing a hybrid or online course and looking for ways to move reading and writing online?

Please join the Teaching and Learning Center for a workshop on Social Reading and Writing with Online Annotation Tools. In this workshop, we’ll look at various Social Annotation (SA) tools and ways in which we can integrate them in our course design. SA tools allow instructors and students to move away from reading and writing as one-dimensional, solitary activities by instead sharing observations, questions, and (multimedia) contextual information in the margins of an online text. SA tools can make texts come alive for students, create community, increase participation and comprehension, and, as a result, improve learning.

We will look at various SA tools such as Hypothes.is, Annotation Studio, and Lacuna, and show the many ways in which you can use them by looking at some samples from CUNY instructors who have already taught with them. We’ll also discuss criteria for selecting tools and consider issues such as privacy, accessibility, and possible drawbacks. Finally, we’ll consider how you can use SA tools in your own classes.

This workshop is the last in a series on Educational Technology, following our previous workshops on Hybrid and Online Instruction and Demystifying Edtech.

Materials

This folder contains outreach materials, workshop plans and resources on online social annotation tools.

Materials Folder: Social Reading and Writing Workshop

Workshop Plan

Overview of Time

1:00-1:15 Introductions

1:15-1:30 Activity I (collaborative annotation of Wideman’s “Stories”)

1:30-1:40 Discussion of activity I

1:40-2:00 Showcase samples / tools

2:00-2:30 Discussion social reading/writing with annotation tools

2:30-2:45 Activity II (design activity for own course or browse/annotate site & list of tools)

2:45-3:00 Questions and survey

Introductions

  •  what/where participants teach
  • what their reasons/goals are for wanting to annotate online with their students
  • anything specific to discuss?

Sample Intro Activity 

Wideman’s Stories: Read, annotate, and then pass on to next participant to share annotations and experience what it’s like to share “drafts of reading.”

Showcase Examples

Before we start the discussion, show some examples of what annotation tools are – briefly showcase a few tools and show some possibilities and limitations.

Discussion of Social Reading/ Writing with Online Social Annotation (SA) Tools

What are SA tools, benefits/drawbacks, criteria for selecting them, including discussion of accessibility (some data from Smale/Regalado), then on to practical: how can you use for your classes? Reference site.

Activity II

Ask participants to formulate for what purposes they want to use an annotation tool in the course(s) they teach, then draft a list of main criteria, and with that explore the list of options, ultimately working toward a draft plan of an assignment or other way in which they want to use annotation tools in their class.

Work in pairs or groups and share findings afterwards. If they’re not there yet (not ready to draft their own activity/assignment) and just want to explore tools, they can experience what it’s like to annotate by using hypothes.is on the site.

Incorporating Cultural Content in the Language Classroom

This workshop was offered in Spring 2019 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by Joanna Birnbaum, José Chavarry, Luis Henao-Uribe, Michael E. Rolland, Inés Vañó García..

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

Many language instructors enter the classroom for the first time without knowledge of language acquisition principles. They are often asked to design their classes based on a textbook that doesn’t speak to students’ experiences and fails to appeal directly to them. New instructors often feel pressured to teach following a grammar-oriented approach that seems to leave little room for practical language skills.

These issues and others have emerged as part of a year-long inquiry into the challenges of teaching languages at CUNY facilitated by the Teaching and Learning Center. Join participants in our Focused Inquiry Group to discuss strategies for balancing grammatical and cultural content to create engaging language learning environments. We will examine different source materials, from textbooks to movies, music videos and Open Educational Resources (OER), and will offer concrete ideas on how to adapt these materials to the needs of various classes. We’ll explore selected language acquisition frameworks, such as Task-based learning and Implicit vs. Explicit Knowledge, that can allow faculty to use culturally relevant content while meeting class goals. Participants are invited to bring any instructional materials that they use. All language instructors are welcome.

Materials

This folder contains outreach materials, workshop plans, and resources.

Materials Folder: Incorporating Cultural Content in the Language Classroom Workshop

Workshop Plan

4:00 – 4:15 (15 min.)

  • Intro: Brainstorming – Think (3min) / Pair ( 2 min) / Share (8 min)
  • Why are we here?  (Concerns):  low-stakes (things that we can control) & higher stakes objectives (out of our control)
  • What is T/P/S? [Meta: The workshop aims to model some pedagogical strategies]

4:15 – 4:40 (25 min.)

  • What is Implicit vs Explicit Knowledge? [Cultural relevant content]
  • Guidelines to select movies / videos / magazines / literary texts.

4:40 – 5:05 (25 min.)

  • Task-Based Language Teaching. [Scaffolding]
  • Hacking the textbook. Strategies to use the textbook to design Task-Based exercises.

5:05 – 5:30 (25 min.) – OERs

  • How to find OERs. [Exit tickets]
  • Limitations and possibilities. Showcasing two models.

5:30 – 6:00 (30 min.)

  • Create a Task-based culminating assignment using different source materials

Peer Review

This workshop was offered in Fall 2016 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by Avra Spector.

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

Have you ever felt concerned about your ability to provide constructive feedback to every student? Are you interested in building your students’ capacity to critically read and engage with each others’ work? Are you interested in building classroom community and incorporating peer review into your course from the start of the semester? Join the Teaching and Learning Center for a workshop on Making Peer Review Work.

Peer review offers students the chance to receive significant and thorough feedback from a variety of readers while alleviating pressure on the instructor to be the sole source of critique. The process can also strengthen students’ grasp of course material and reinforce the communication goals that are often important parts of our courses.

In this workshop, we’ll discuss modes of peer-to-peer work that can be implemented across disciplines as well as peer review strategies suited to a range of focus areas and assignments, including low stake and high stake student writing, problem sets, idea and project development, lab reports, and more.

Please bring any favorite peer review activities and sample writing (your own or a student’s) for workshop peer review activities.

Materials

This folder contains outreach materials and workshop plans.

Materials Folder: Peer Review Workshop

Workshop Plan

1:00-1:20 Introductions & brief pres/discussion of PR

  • potential of peer review?
  • why peer review, advantages/dangers
  • secondary objectives
  • situating the role of the reviewer

1:20-1:45 Peer Review Activity I (essay)

  • Essay / in class one step /person switch

1:45-2:00 discussion  (lead to: convo about student effort and participation–>incentivizing)

  • Effort + participation
  • Incentivizing
  • Reflexivity of assignment

2:00-2:20 Peer Review Activity II  (ideas/problem sets)

2:20-2:30 Discussion  (lead to: convo about potential problems of bad advice)

  • Potential problems of pr:
  • bad advice, confusing others, etc
  • Size of pr groups

2:30-2:45 Peer Review Activity III

  • With a rubric / and comments / discuss: functionality: reinforces key points of assignment
  • At home v in class
  • Developing types of questions: avoid y/n language

2:45-3:00 Discussion (lead to: facilitating PR) & Survey

Putting NYC to Work: Using Place-Based Assignments in Your Courses

This workshop was offered in Fall 2017 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by Elizabeth Alsop.

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

In the second installment of the TLC’s two-part workshop series on place-based learning, we’ll explore strategies for creating and integrating creative assignments that take advantage of New York’s cultural resources, including its many archives, museums, libraries, performing arts institutions, green spaces, etc. We’ll start by considering the history and theory behind experiential learning, and discuss its particular affordances within the CUNY context. We’ll then look at examples of place-based assignments drawn from CUNY campuses, with an eye toward identifying the pedagogical and practical factors to consider when structuring experiential learning opportunities: from logistical challenges, to options for assessing creative assignments, to designing site-based activities that streamline rather than add to instructor workload. We’ll then work together to devise place-based activities that we can include in our courses and transport across disciplines.

Materials

This folder contains outreach materials, workshop plans, handouts, examples and a bibliography on the topic.

Materials Folder: Putting NYC to Work: Using Place-Based Assignments in Your Courses Workshop

Workshop Plan

Overview of Time

1:00-1:15 Introductions

1:15-1:30 Overview:  History, Theory, Pedagogical Rationale (cuny context)

1:30-1:45 Example Showcase

1:45-2:15 Activity I: Design a place-based activity (independently/in groups)

2:15-2:45 Discussion and Feedback with group 

2:45-3:00 Questions and Survey

I. Introductions (15 min)

II. Overview: History & Theory

  • Definitions: What is place-based learning?
  • From “What” → “Why”?
  • With all this in mind: Why not use place-based assignments in your courses?

III. Example Showcase

IV. Activity 

Having looked at the sample assignments, begin to devise a possible place-based assignment we might incorporate in a current (or future) course – Framing questions

15 minutes for solo work; then confer and workshop ideas with a partner for 15 min. Then we’ll all go around and share with the group

[Handout: Faculty Questions]

[Handout: Student Questions]

V. Discussion 

  • Go around and share with the group
  • What resources would be useful to you going forward?
  • List of places/contacts/free days/museum educators?

VI. Wrap-Up/Survey  

Expanding your Pedagogical Toolkit

This workshop was offered in Fall 2018 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by Asilia Franklin-Phipps.

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

Looking for new and creative instructional practices to enliven your classroom? Interested in learning new ways to structure your students’ engagement with course materials?

Energetic class discussions can help connect emerging thinking to the reading students are doing. A supportive classroom community can reduce anxiety about learning, and create space for reflection and intellectual engagement. These are essential components for courses that we wish to resonate well-past the final exam. The goal of this workshop is to help build and expand your pedagogical toolkit with a range of activities that assist in facilitating these kinds of experiences in our classrooms.

We will look at a collection of classroom activities with a variety of pedagogical goals, and discuss their use and potential across disciplines. Participants will leave with specific classroom activities, along with ideas about how to incorporate them into their teaching.

Materials

This folder contains outreach materials, workshop plans, handouts, slides, and resources.

Materials Folder: Expanding your Pedagogical Toolkit Workshop

Workshop Plan

Materials Needed: 

  1. Index cards with activities on them (multiple?)–all one color
  2. Index cards with categories on them (purpose and other descriptors)–all another color
  3. Handout with the discussion questions (Activity II)
  4. Handout with all of the activity ideas on them
  5. A worksheet to develop an activity for integration into particular teaching context (part of the handout).
  6. Tape –to make the activity cards
  7. Some way of presenting/displaying the different index cards
  8. Big paper (one for each table)

3:00- Introductions: 1–Overview and introductions

  • Name
  • Department
  • Teaching Context
  • Interest in coming to the workshop
  • Concerns or issues with classroom activities
  • Hope to leave with:

3:15 – Activity I 

  • Ideas:
  • Proliferation:
  • Pedagogical Toolkit Installation: Briefly discuss what the index cards are of and allow attendees time to spend some time with them. They can do this by categorizing them using a variety of headings in groups of 3-4.
  • Purpose: Attendance / Community Building / Engagement / Exploring a concept, theory, or topic / Introducing a topic / Practicing a skill / Checking for understanding / Preparing for discussion/writing/assignment / _____________________?
  • Other Descriptors: Low-Preparation (for you as the instructor) / Medium-Preparation / High-Preparation / 10-15 minutes in class / 15-30 minutes in class / 30-60 minutes in class / 60+ minutes in class / Low-Stakes / High-Stakes  / ____________?

THEN…

After they have done this, they can choose 1 or 2 cards that they would like to think more about or would consider incorporating into their own teaching.

Once they have chosen a few, they can respond to three questions on the blank side.

Questions that they can choose to answer and discuss.

  • How does this meet your students’ learning needs?
  • How does this address your students’ interests and strengths?
  • Why might this activity be useful to you?
  • How does this activity serve the goals of your class?
  • How does this activity facilitate your development as a classroom instructor?
  • What challenges might this activity present for you and your students?

3:30 – Curation: 

In groups, share 1-2 your activities and discuss.

You might consider a few of the following questions for each activity (handout #1):

  • What might these activities produce in a classroom space? –community building, checking for understanding, addressing a particular course concern, introducing a topic, providing additional practice with a topic, engagement, etc.
  • How might you adapt this activity to your own teaching context?
  • If you imagine doing this activity in your class, what would you consider “success”? What would you consider “failure”?
  • What potential issues or challenges do you foresee?
  • How will you make sure that this activity is accessible?

Whole-Group Discussion

4:00 (optional, if time) – Activity II

“Speed sharing” ideas of adapting some of these ideas to particular instructional contexts

Languages

This workshop was offered in Fall 2017 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by Anke Geertsma.

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

Approximately 40 percent of CUNY undergraduates speak a language other than English at home, and with 174 different languages spoken across campuses, CUNY is one of the most linguistically diverse universities in the nation. Are you looking for ways to leverage this multilingualism in your classroom? Do you want to better support your non-native English speaking students? Or are you an international student teaching, or getting ready to teach, but who finds the prospect of teaching in English daunting?

Please join the Teaching and Learning Center for a workshop on languages at CUNY. Multilingualism is an asset in the classroom, and in this workshop we’ll discuss and strategize ways to support and improve our students’ learning by leveraging their–and our own–diverse language backgrounds.

We’ll discuss three different types of non-native English speakers–international students, recent immigrants, and Generation 1.5 students–and reflect on how our classroom practices might support and build upon their language skills. We’ll also consider ways in which international or multilingual instructors can enhance their teaching using their linguistic backgrounds. We’ll share sample activities and (re-)design activities or assignments for our own classes (bring them!) that takes full advantages of the wide range of language spoken by ourselves and our students.

Materials

This folder contains outreach materials, workshop plans and resources.

Materials Folder: Languages Workshop

Workshop Plan

Intro Activity:My Name, My Identity” (10-15 mins)

Part I: Multilingual Students (1 hr)

  1. Languages at CUNY:
    • definitions (ESL vs. ELL vs. NNES / NNS vs. multilingual students / emergent bilingual)
    • NNS at CUNY data
    • categories of NNS at CUNY (foreign/international students vs. recent immigrants vs. 1.5 generation) and differences in language use
  2. Supporting multilingual students in your class:
    • including section on how to respond to NNS writing
  3. Leveraging multilingualism in your class:
    • sample activities (Great Works, …)
    • translanguaging: linguistic systems vs. languages

Part II: Multilingual Instructors (45 mins)

  1. Strategies for teaching as NNS
  2. Using your languages in your teaching.

Questioning our Linguistic Practices

This workshop was offered in Fall 2019 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by Talisa Feliciano and Inés Vañó García.

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

How does your linguistic positionality shape your teaching and learning practices? How do we engage the multilingual student body within the CUNY system? Despite the linguistic diversity within  CUNY, our pedagogical practices often do not align with this reality: classes tend to be monolingual, asking students to produce knowledge (essays, papers, presentations and more) in academic/standard English. In this workshop we will envision pedagogical tools that are inclusive of the different languages, dialects, and linguistic repertoires that students speak.

Join the TLC for a workshop on Monday, November 11 3-5 pm in Room 9205 to question our linguistic practices in the classroom and investigate multiples alternatives que van más allá de la clase monolingüe. Our linguistic practices refer to the language(s) and dialect(s) we speak, read, think, and teach in/with/in (between). Thus, language is a social construct, a product of class, racialized, ethnic, and gendered experiences. Linguistic practices also refer to the how of language: tone, body language, colloquialisms, gestures. We will explore linguistic positionality, for ourselves and our students, in order to understand the institutional burbuja en la que nos encontramos. The lived realities of institutional demands such as pressure to succeed and adherence to learning structures we already know have implications that privilege Standard American English.

We invite you to discuss the politics of language and bring an assignment, rubric, or assessment tool to workshop for language inclusivity.

Museum pedagogy

This workshop was offered in Spring 2018 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by Sarah Litvin and Elizabeth Decker.

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

Over the past generation, museums have undergone an enormous transition. No longer simply repositories of artifacts and authority, they are now, as the Smithsonian’s Stephen E. Weil once described, “a place for somebody.” As museums have moved toward a visitor-centered approach, their education departments have professionalized and developed a series of techniques designed to engage visitors, spur interaction, and spark retention.

Over the past four months, supported by the Teaching and Learning Center, museum educators and classroom instructors have worked together in an interdisciplinary Focused Inquiry Group to develop best practices and lesson plans, and to explore how we might adapt museum educators’ tools and tricks for the college classroom.

Join us on Thursday, February 22 in Room 9205 at 6:30-8:30 PM to learn how the museum education toolkit can enliven your classroom lessons and take-home assignments. We’ll dive into several model activities that use museum pedagogies to foster active, student-centered, and creative undergraduate experiences. We will also take a look at the theoretical underpinnings of these strategies, and provide examples of how we have used them in our own teaching in several different disciplines. In the last portion of the workshop, we’ll invite you to think about how you might apply museum pedagogy in your own courses. With that in mind, you are encouraged to bring a lesson plan that you would like to workshop!

Interested but can’t make it? Stay tuned: As an extension of this workshop, we are developing a digital resource that will offer CUNY instructors tools and models to integrate museum pedagogy into their courses.

This event is co-sponsored by the CUNY Public History Collective.

Materials

This folder contains outreach materials, workshop plans and slides.

Materials Folder: Museum pedagogy Workshop

Workshop Plan

Introductions:

  • Name, Program, What you teach, Why did you come to this workshop?

Part 1: Modeling Museum Pedagogy in the Classroom

A. Barometer (5 min)

B. Rummaging and Close Looking (10 min)

C. Creative Writing (15 min)

D. Class as Curator (10 min)

E. Possibly do another barometer

Part 2: Unpacking the Toolkit

A. Physicality: (6 min)

    • Theory
    • Examples from what we did above
    • Examples from our own lesson plans

B. Materiality (6 min)

C. Narrativity & Storytelling (6 min)

D. Class as Curator (6 min)

Participants Think about Applications to their Own Teaching (maybe 30 min)

    • Free form with guiding question:
      • Have an assignment in mind: tell us about it. Where do you see any of these things fitting in.
      • What’s a strategy you want to try and how would it helpful?
      • Are there any barriers to using these? What kinds of adaptations would you need to make?
      • What do you think would be the benefits of this to your class?

Increasing Scientific Literacy

Increasing Scientific Literacy was offered in the Fall 2019 as an in-person workshop at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The workshop and materials were developed by John Zayac.

All materials on this page and in the linked google folder are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 4.0 International Public License.

Outreach

Faculty across the CUNY regularly address complex, scientifically-grounded issues such as climate change, genetically-modified foods, vaccines, and evolution. For many of these politically-charged topics, there are fundamental scientific principles that can help students to more fully understand the topic. Increased scientific literacy can help students better interact with complex social problems, and can also help expand their abilities to propose solutions.

Join the Teaching and Learning Center for a workshop where we will develop a working definition of what scientific literacy means in the context of the CUNY classroom. Workshop participants will then identify scientific theories that undergird topics in their own disciplines and then work to break them down into common, foundational concepts – a method that can be employed by all instructors in their classrooms, and by students across the CUNY curriculum and in their everyday lives.

Materials

This folder contains outreach materials, workshop plans and slides.

Materials Folder: Increasing Scientific Literacy

Workshop Plan

00:00 – 00:15: Introductions: discipline, CUNY campus(es), statement of individual workshop goals.

00:15 – 00:30 What is scientific literacy?

  • Small group discussion, consensus building.

00:30 – 00:45: Whole group – discussion of ideas from small group activity

  • Handout – Questions from the NSF National Scientific Literacy Test
  • Do these questions assess what we have defined here? Which ones do, which do not?

00:45 – 01:00: Breaking down complex concepts to science fundamentals – laws, theories, hypotheses.

01:00 – 01:30: Identify scientific concepts for small group work

  • If no volunteers – climate science, energy, vaccines, Earth is (pseudo)spherical.

01:30 – 01:50: Report minimization back to large group

01:50 – 02:00: Wrap up and pitch for future work (office hours).

Resources:

American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2018) Perceptions of Science in America

Vincent DeFrancesco (2015) “How Science-Literate Are You?” Chronicle of Higher Education

Kennedy and Hefron (2019) “What Americans Know About Science” Pew Research Center.

National Science Foundation (2018) Science and Engineering Indicators, 2018

Pew Research Center Science Knowledge Quiz” 

Eoin O’Carroll (2011) “Are you scientifically literate? Take our quiz.” Christian Science Monitor